Tag Archives: belief in yourself

You “Gotta” Believe, Or Else…

Frank Edwin “Tug” McGraw Jr. was a Major League Baseball relief pitcher and the father of country music singer Tim McGraw.

He is likely best remembered for two things… recording the final out, via a strikeout, in the 1980 World Series, bringing the Philadelphia Phillies their first world championship… and his pithy quote referenced in the title above, “You Gotta Believe!”

Belief is a big factor in sales, sales management and, for that matter, any form of business or institutional leadership. We all must believe in ourselves, in our organizations, and that the job can be done.

Sales professionals must believe in the products and services they sell, and also that organizational leadership will support what they’re selling.

Sales managers and leaders must believe in the same things, and also in their team’s ability to do the job.

These beliefs are contagious.

But so too is the lack of belief!

Therefore, whether we are sales managers, team supervisors, group leaders, department heads or business owners, we should carefully question our dis-beliefs, because if we doubt our team’s ability to do the job; if we have second-thoughts about their dedication or loyalty to the cause; if we second-guess each move they make; if we have no faith in them, then it will show.

Even worse, it will show in their performance, because they will sense the doubt and become paralyzed by the fear of ridicule or worse; and it will filter-through to their families and friends, to our clients and prospects, and, ultimately, to the marketplace.

Our belief, or lack thereof, cannot be masked; so as leaders we might do well to consider our true beliefs and make a conscious effort to either develop an honest belief in our work force or develop a work force in-which we believe; and then we must find ways to express that belief each and every day.

The positive results might truly be surprising!

As the late Zig Ziglar once said, “A lot of people have gone further than they thought they could because someone else thought they could.”

Do You Believe… in You?

possibleIn an earlier post we referenced Frank Edwin “Tug” McGraw Jr., who was a Major League Baseball relief pitcher and the father of country music singer Tim McGraw. As noted in that post, he is likely best remembered for two things… recording the final out, via a strikeout, in the 1980 World Series, bringing the Philadelphia Phillies their first world championship… and his pithy quote…,

“You Gotta Believe!”

Have you ever wondered about the impact of belief, or the value of believing not only in what we do, but also in our own ability to do it?

Much has been written about these concepts, including well-known examples such as “The Power of Positive Thinking,” by Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, and Rhonda Byrne’s “The Secret.”

Here are a few more, possibly less-famous, perspectives on how our belief or conviction might enable us to achieve greater levels of success or fulfillment:

In his book, “The Power of Self-Confidence,” Brian Tracy concludes that “the foundation quality of success in every walk of life is self-confidence.”

Tracy also shares examples and case studies, and suggests, “If you had unlimited self-confidence, you would be more powerful, popular and persuasive… you would be admired, respected and sought after… recognition and responsibilities would flow to you because of people’s belief in your ability to do what it took to get the job done.”

In his article “The Greatest Principle of Human Persuasion,” author and sales expert G. Harold McLeod identifies a person’s conviction as the most persuasive component of communication. “People are persuaded more by the depth of your conviction than by the height of your logic,” he says. “…more by your own enthusiasm than any proof you can offer. Put another way, people are converted not to your way of thinking; they are persuaded more by your way of feeling, your way of believing.”

In his book “The Art of the Solo Performer,” author and musician Steve Rapson explains that at one time or another even the most seasoned artists — whether they be musicians, actors, singers or speakers — are affected by nervousness or stage-fright, and that the most effective way of overcoming the affliction involves a combination of “preparation and conviction.”

These beliefs are not only important, but also contagious!

Read the full article…

The Power of Conviction!

conviction copyHave you ever wondered about the impact of belief, or the value of believing not only in what we do, but also in our own ability to do it?

Much has been written about these concepts, which have been categorized in various ways, including believing in yourself, faith, conviction, laws of attraction, or self-confidence. Well-known examples include “The Power of Positive Thinking,” by Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, and Rhonda Byrne’s “The Secret.”

Here are a few additional perspectives on how our belief or conviction might enable us to achieve greater levels of success or fulfillment…

Read the full article…

You “Gotta” Believe – The Flip Side

In an earlier post we referenced a quote from baseball’s Tug McGraw, “You gotta believe.”

It was noted that sales professionals as well as sales managers must believe in the products and services they sell, and also that organizational leadership will support what they’re selling. We also noted that sales managers and other leaders must believe in their team’s ability to do the job.

As many people have agreed, these beliefs are contagious… but so too is the lack of belief!

Therefore, whether we are sales managers, team supervisors, group leaders, department heads or business owners, we should carefully question our disbeliefs, because if we doubt our team’s ability to do the job; if we have second-thoughts about their dedication or loyalty to the cause; if we second-guess each move they make; if we have no faith in them, then it will show.

Even worse, it will show in their performance because they will sense the doubt and become paralyzed by the fear of ridicule or worse; and it will filter-through to their families and friends, to our clients and prospects, and, ultimately, to the marketplace.

Our belief, or lack thereof, cannot be masked, so as leaders we might do well to consider our true beliefs and make a conscious effort to either develop an honest belief in our work force or develop a work force in-which we believe; and then we must find ways to express that belief each and every day.

The positive results might truly be surprising!

As the late Zig Ziglar once said, “A lot of people have gone further than they thought they could because someone else thought they could.”